Art and Archaeology
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As a destination for the modern age by learned travellers on the Grand Tour, Sicily has always been identified as an outdoor museum of ancient civilizations, not only useful to appreciate Greek and Roman artifacts and architectural complexes, but also to study and understand patterns of life. Taormina, Siracusa, Agrigento, Segesta and Selinunte were required stops for those seeking the other side of those ancient peoples on the island. In the last century, our thirst for knowledge has been satisfied by new discoveries, new cities and new landscapes thanks to modern science and archaeological excavations. Inland Sicily has much to offer in this sense: the “Dea di Morgantina” Tourism District is composed of a mosaic of amazing and educational archaeology, ancient and modern art, and medieval and more recent architecture. Of course Villa Romana del Casale in Piazza Armerina stands out with its UNESCO recognition and mosaics that evoke ancient beauty in unlikely costumes (but by reading closely, you can discover new truths about the “bikini”…). Morgantina however, is the city that shows ancient societies like few other archaeological sites, it plays a key role in this cultural patchwork. As well as, the Archaeological Museum in Aidone, with the newfound majestic Goddess, whose story is told through skilled artisans and collective worship. There is also the archaeology of Centuripe, which slips into the village and craftsmanship of today’s artisans; or the fortress of Enna; and Monte San Mauro in Caltagirone with its indigenous centers dating back prior to Greek settlements. Archaeology also connects the architecture of medieval castles (Enna, Piazza Armerina, Aidone), towers, farms and urban plots that survived through the millennia that separates us from those times. Inside the churches you will find that architecture has often been rebuilt after earthquakes and wars. There is still the artistic heritage of painters and sculptors like Filippo Paladini, Mattia Preti, Pietro Novelli, Pietro Ruzzolone, Simone de Wobreck, Francesco and Olivio Sozzi, Paolo Vetri, Filippo Liardo, Guglielmo Borremans, Fra’ Umile of Petralia and the Gagini. The open-air show at the staircase of Santa Maria del Monte in Caltagirone and the Liberty style, which runs alongside the late Calatin Baroque is part of all this multi-millenial artistic tradition shared by: The Archaeological Museums in Centuripe, Aidone, Enna and Piazza Armerina, and the Museums of ceramics and nativity scenes in Caltagirone, as well as, many other ethno-anthropological museums.

 

 

  Click to listen highlighted text! As a destination for the modern age by learned travellers on the Grand Tour, Sicily has always been identified as an outdoor museum of ancient civilizations, not only useful to appreciate Greek and Roman artifacts and architectural complexes, but also to study and understand patterns of life. Taormina, Siracusa, Agrigento, Segesta and Selinunte were required stops for those seeking the other side of those ancient peoples on the island. In the last century, our thirst for knowledge has been satisfied by new discoveries, new cities and new landscapes thanks to modern science and archaeological excavations. Inland Sicily has much to offer in this sense: the “Dea di Morgantina” Tourism District is composed of a mosaic of amazing and educational archaeology, ancient and modern art, and medieval and more recent architecture. Of course Villa Romana del Casale in Piazza Armerina stands out with its UNESCO recognition and mosaics that evoke ancient beauty in unlikely costumes (but by reading closely, you can discover new truths about the “bikini”…). Morgantina however, is the city that shows ancient societies like few other archaeological sites, it plays a key role in this cultural patchwork. As well as, the Archaeological Museum in Aidone, with the newfound majestic Goddess, whose story is told through skilled artisans and collective worship. There is also the archaeology of Centuripe, which slips into the village and craftsmanship of today’s artisans; or the fortress of Enna; and Monte San Mauro in Caltagirone with its indigenous centers dating back prior to Greek settlements. Archaeology also connects the architecture of medieval castles (Enna, Piazza Armerina, Aidone), towers, farms and urban plots that survived through the millennia that separates us from those times. Inside the churches you will find that architecture has often been rebuilt after earthquakes and wars. There is still the artistic heritage of painters and sculptors like Filippo Paladini, Mattia Preti, Pietro Novelli, Pietro Ruzzolone, Simone de Wobreck, Francesco and Olivio Sozzi, Paolo Vetri, Filippo Liardo, Guglielmo Borremans, Fra’ Umile of Petralia and the Gagini. The open-air show at the staircase of Santa Maria del Monte in Caltagirone and the Liberty style, which runs alongside the late Calatin Baroque is part of all this multi-millenial artistic tradition shared by: The Archaeological Museums in Centuripe, Aidone, Enna and Piazza Armerina, and the Museums of ceramics and nativity scenes in Caltagirone, as well as, many other ethno-anthropological museums.    

 

 

 


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